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Negative sign (astrology)

In astrology, a negative, receptive, dispassive, yin, nocturnal or feminine sign refers to any of the six even-numbered signs of the zodiac: Taurus, Cancer, Virgo, Scorpio, Capricorn, or Pisces. There is no value judgment attached to the terms ne ...

                                               

Negative space

Negative space, in art, is the space around and between the subject of an image. Negative space may be most evident when the space around a subject, not the subject itself, forms an interesting or artistically relevant shape, and such space occas ...

                                               

Negative stain

Negative staining is an established method, often used in diagnostic microscopy, for contrasting a thin specimen with an optically opaque fluid. In this technique, the background is stained, leaving the actual specimen untouched, and thus visible ...

                                               

Negative temperature

Certain systems can achieve negative temperature ; that is, their temperature can be expressed as a negative quantity on the Kelvin or Rankine scales. The absolute temperature Kelvin scale can be understood loosely as a measure of average kinetic ...

                                               

Negative thermal expansion

Negative thermal expansion is an unusual physicochemical process in which some materials contract upon heating, rather than expand as most other materials do. The most well-known material with NTE is water at 0~4 °C. Materials which undergo NTE h ...

                                               

Negative time

                                               

Negative utilitarianism

Negative utilitarianism is a form of negative consequentialism that can be described as the view that we should minimize the total amount of aggregate suffering, or that we should minimize suffering and then, secondarily, maximize the total amoun ...

                                               

Negative volume index

Nearly 78 years have passed since Paul L. Dysart, Jr. invented the Negative Volume Index and Positive Volume Index indicators. The indicators remain useful to identify primary market trends and reversals. In 1936, Paul L. Dysart, Jr. began accumu ...

                                               

Negative-dimensional space

In topology, a discipline within mathematics, a negative-dimensional space is an extension of the usual notion of space, allowing for negative dimensions. The concept of negative-dimensional spaces is applied, for example, to analyze linguistic s ...

                                               

Negatively charged

                                               

Negentropy

In information theory and statistics, negentropy is used as a measure of distance to normality. The concept and phrase negative entropy was introduced by Erwin Schrodinger in his 1944 popular-science book What is Life? Later, Leon Brillouin short ...

                                               

Policy debate

Policy debate is a form of debate competition in which teams of two advocate for and against a resolution that typically calls for policy change by the United States federal government. It is also referred to as cross-examination debate because o ...

                                               

Positive and Negative Affect Schedule

The Positive and Negative Affect Schedule is a self-report questionnaire that consists of two 10-item scales to measure both positive and negative affect. Each item is rated on a 5-point scale of 1 to 5. The measure has been used mainly as a rese ...

                                               

Signed measure

There are two slightly different concepts of a signed measure, depending on whether or not one allows it to take infinite values. In research papers and advanced books signed measures are usually only allowed to take finite values, while undergra ...

                                               

Signed zero

Signed zero is zero with an associated sign. In ordinary arithmetic, the number 0 does not have a sign, so that −0, +0 and 0 are identical. However, in computing, some number representations allow for the existence of two zeros, often denoted by ...

                                               

List of eponymous laws

This list of eponymous laws provides links to articles on laws, principles, adages, and other succinct observations or predictions named after a person. In some cases the person named has coined the law – such as Parkinsons law. In others, the wo ...

                                               

Anna Karenina principle

The Anna Karenina principle states that a deficiency in any one of a number of factors dooms an endeavor to failure. Consequently, a successful endeavor is one where every possible deficiency has been avoided. The name of the principle derives fr ...

                                               

Anthropic principle

The anthropic principle is a philosophical consideration that any data we collect about the universe is filtered by the fact that, in order for it to be observable in the first place, it must be compatible with the conscious and sapient life that ...

                                               

Basic limiting principle

A Basic Limiting Principle is a general principle that limits our explanations metaphysically or epistemologically, and which normally goes unquestioned or even unnoticed in our everyday or scientific thinking. The term was introduced by the phil ...

                                               

Bateman's principle

Batemans principle, in evolutionary biology, is that in most species, variability in reproductive success is greater in males than in females. It was first proposed by Angus John Bateman, an English geneticist. Bateman suggested that, since males ...

                                               

Canon (basic principle)

The concept of canon is very broad; in a general sense it refers to being one or a group of official, authentic or approved rules or laws, particularly ecclesiastical; or group of official, authentic, or approved literary or artistic works, such ...

                                               

Chesterton's fence

                                               

Church–Turing–Deutsch principle

In computer science and quantum physics, the Church–Turing–Deutsch principle is a stronger, physical form of the Church–Turing thesis formulated by David Deutsch in 1985. The principle states that a universal computing device can simulate every p ...

                                               

Clarke's three laws

British science fiction writer Arthur C. Clarke formulated three adages that are known as Clarkes three laws, of which the third law is the best known and most widely cited. They were part of his ideas in his extensive writings about the future. ...

                                               

Concision

Concision is using only the words necessary to convey an idea. It aims to enhance communication by eliminating redundancy without omitting important information. Concision has been described as one of the elementary principles of writing. The rel ...

                                               

Cooperative principle

In social science generally and linguistics specifically, the cooperative principle describes how people achieve effective conversational communication in common social situations - that is, how listeners and speakers act cooperatively and mutual ...

                                               

Copernican principle

In physical cosmology, the Copernican principle states that humans, on the Earth or in the Solar System, are not privileged observers of the universe. Named for Copernican heliocentrism, it is a working assumption that arises from a modified cosm ...

                                               

Correspondence principle

In physics, the correspondence principle states that the behavior of systems described by the theory of quantum mechanics reproduces classical physics in the limit of large quantum numbers. In other words, it says that for large orbits and for la ...

                                               

Cosmological principle

In modern physical cosmology, the cosmological principle is the notion that the spatial distribution of matter in the universe is homogeneous and isotropic when viewed on a large enough scale, since the forces are expected to act uniformly throug ...

                                               

D'Alembert's principle

DAlemberts principle, also known as the Lagrange–dAlembert principle, is a statement of the fundamental classical laws of motion. It is named after its discoverer, the French physicist and mathematician Jean le Rond dAlembert. It is the dynamic a ...

                                               

Disquotational principle

The disquotational principle is a philosophical principle which holds that a rational speaker will accept p if and only if he or she believes p. The quotes indicate that the statement p is being treated as a sentence, and not as a proposition. Th ...

                                               

Divine Principle

                                               

Dogma

Dogma is an official system of principles or doctrines of a religion, such as Roman Catholicism, or the positions of a philosopher or of a philosophical school such as Stoicism. In the pejorative sense, dogma refers to enforced decisions, such as ...

                                               

Equivalence principle

In the theory of general relativity, the equivalence principle is the equivalence of gravitational and inertial mass, and Albert Einsteins observation that the gravitational "force" as experienced locally while standing on a massive body is the s ...

                                               

Equivalence principle (geometric)

The equivalence principle is one of the corner-stones of gravitation theory. Different formulations of the equivalence principle are labeled weakest, weak, middle-strong and strong. All of these formulations are based on the empirical equality of ...

                                               

Evidential existentiality

The principle of evidential existentiality in philosophy is a principle that explains and gives value to the existence of entities. The principle states that the reality of an entitys existence gives greater value to prove its existence than woul ...

                                               

Exclusion principle (philosophy)

The exclusion principle is a philosophical principle that states: If an event e causes event e*, then there is no event e# such that e# is non-supervenient on e and e# causes e*.

                                               

Fermat's principle

Fermats principle, also known as the principle of least time, is the link between ray optics and wave optics. In its original "strong" form, Fermats principle states that the path taken by a ray between two given points is the path that can be tr ...

                                               

First principle

A first principle is a basic proposition or assumption that cannot be deduced from any other proposition or assumption. In philosophy, first principles are from First Cause attitudes and taught by Aristotelians, and nuanced versions of first prin ...

                                               

Godwin's law

Godwins law is an Internet adage asserting that "As an online discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Hitler approaches 1". That is, if an online discussion goes on long enough, sooner or later someone will com ...

                                               

Hamilton's principle

In physics, Hamiltons principle is William Rowan Hamiltons formulation of the principle of stationary action. It states that the dynamics of a physical system is determined by a variational problem for a functional based on a single function, the ...

                                               

Hanlon's razor

Hanlons razor is an aphorism expressed in various ways, including: Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity. Probably named after a Robert J. Hanlon, it is a philosophical razor which suggests a way of eliminating ...

                                               

Hitchens's razor

Hitchens razor is an epistemological razor expressed by writer Christopher Hitchens. It says that the burden of proof regarding the truthfulness of a claim lies with the one who makes the claim; if this burden is not met, then the claim is unfoun ...

                                               

Hu–Washizu principle

In continuum mechanics, and in particular in finite element analysis, the Hu–Washizu principle is a variational principle which says that the action ∫ V e dV-\int _{S_{\sigma }^{e}}{\bar {T}}^{T}u\ dS} is stationary, where C {\displaystyle C} is ...

                                               

Humanitarian principles

There are a number of meanings for the term humanitarian. Here humanitarian pertains to the practice of saving lives and alleviating suffering. It is usually related to emergency response whether in the case of a natural disaster or a man-made di ...

                                               

Identity of indiscernibles

The identity of indiscernibles is an ontological principle that states that there cannot be separate objects or entities that have all their properties in common. That is, entities x and y are identical if every predicate possessed by x is also p ...

                                               

Instantiation principle

The instantiation principle or principle of instantiation or principle of exemplification is the concept in metaphysics and logic that there can be no uninstantiated or unexemplified properties. In other words, it is impossible for a property to ...

                                               

KK thesis

The KK thesis or KK principle is a principle of epistemic logic which states that "If you know that P is the case then you know that you know that P is the case." This means that one cannot know that P if he does not know whether his knowledge of ...

                                               

LaSalle's invariance principle

LaSalles invariance principle is a criterion for the asymptotic stability of an autonomous dynamical system.

                                               

Landauer's principle

Landauers principle is a physical principle pertaining to the lower theoretical limit of energy consumption of computation. It holds that "any logically irreversible manipulation of information, such as the erasure of a bit or the merging of two ...

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