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Forbidden knowledge

Forbidden knowledge, which is different from secret knowledge, is used to describe forbidden books or other information to which access is restricted or deprecated for political or religious reasons. Forbidden knowledge is commonly not secret, ra ...

                                               

Foreknowledge

Foreknowledge is the concept of knowledge regarding future events. Types of foreknowledge include: Knowledge of predestination Prophecy - Religious concept of divine knowledge, often with a consideration of future trends or events, and to some de ...

                                               

Functional illiteracy

Functional illiteracy is reading and writing skills that are inadequate "to manage daily living and employment tasks that require reading skills beyond a basic level". Functional illiteracy is contrasted with illiteracy in the strict sense, meani ...

                                               

General knowledge

General knowledge is information that has been accumulated over time through various mediums. It excludes specialized learning that can only be obtained with extensive training and information confined to a single medium. General knowledge is an ...

                                               

Gettier problem

The Gettier problem, in the field of epistemology, is a landmark philosophical problem concerning our understanding of descriptive knowledge. Attributed to American philosopher Edmund Gettier, Gettier-type counterexamples challenge the long-held ...

                                               

Growth of knowledge

A term coined by Karl Popper in his work The Logic of Scientific Discovery to denote what he regarded as the main problem of methodology and the philosophy of science, i.e. to explain and promote the further growth of scientific knowledge. To thi ...

                                               

Half-life of knowledge

The half-life of knowledge or half-life of facts is the amount of time that has to elapse before half of the knowledge or facts in a particular area is superseded or shown to be untrue. These coined terms belong to the field of quantitative analy ...

                                               

Ignorance

Ignorance is a lack of knowledge and information. The word "ignorant" is an adjective that describes a person in the state of being unaware, and can describe individuals who deliberately ignore or disregard important information or facts, or indi ...

                                               

Inert knowledge

Inert knowledge is information which one can express but not use. The process of understanding by learners does not happen to that extent where the knowledge can be used for effective problem-solving in realistic situations. The phenomenon of ine ...

                                               

Informality

Informality is a social and cultural difficulties associated with the opacity of social phenomena for people. Informality is often used for unplanned settlements and shadows, and the hidden second economy. Informality is linked to poverty, underd ...

                                               

Institutional memory

Institutional memory has been defined as "the stored knowledge within the organization." Within any organization, tools and techniques will need to be adapted to meet that organizations needs. These adaptations are developed over time and taught ...

                                               

Intellectualism

Intellectualism denotes the use, development, and exercise of the intellect; the practice of being an intellectual; and the Life of the Mind. In the field of philosophy," intellectualism” occasionally is synonymous with" rationalism”, that is, kn ...

                                               

Interactional expertise

Interactional expertise is part of a more complex classification of expertise developed by Harry Collins and Robert Evans. In this initial formulation interactional expertise was part of a threefold classification of substantive expertise that al ...

                                               

Multidisciplinarity

Interdisciplinarity or interdisciplinary studies involves the combining of two or more academic disciplines into one activity. It draws knowledge from several other fields like sociology, anthropology, psychology, economics etc. It is about creat ...

                                               

Internal monologue

An internal monologue, also called self-talk, inner speech, inner discourse or internal discourse, is a persons inner voice which provides a running verbal monologue of thoughts while they are conscious. It is usually tied to a persons sense of s ...

                                               

Internet science

Internet science is an interdisciplinary science that examines all aspects of the co-evolution in Internet networks and society. It works in the intersection of and in the gaps among a wide range of disciplines that have had to respond to the imp ...

                                               

Intertwingularity

Intertwingularity is a term coined by Ted Nelson to express the complexity of interrelations in human knowledge. Nelson wrote in Computer Lib/Dream Machines Nelson 1974, p. DM45: "EVERYTHING IS DEEPLY INTERTWINGLED. In an important sense there ar ...

                                               

Jnana

In Indian philosophy and religion, jñana or is "knowledge". The idea of jnana centers on a cognitive event which is recognized when experienced. It is knowledge inseparable from the total experience of reality, especially a total or divine realit ...

                                               

Know thyself

The Ancient Greek aphorism know thyself ", is one of the Delphic maxims and was inscribed in the pronaos of the Temple of Apollo at Delphi according to the Greek writer Pausanias. In Latin the phrase, "know thyself," is given as nosce te ipsum or ...

                                               

Know-it-all

A know-it-all or know-all is a person who constantly presents their input as though they were professionally trained, schooled or have firsthand insight into subjects when it is evident this is not the case.

                                               

Knowledge-based theory of the firm

The knowledge-based theory of the firm considers knowledge as the most strategically significant resource of a firm. Its proponents argue that because knowledge-based resources are usually difficult to imitate and socially complex, heterogeneous ...

                                               

Literacy

Literacy is popularly understood as an ability to read, write and use numeracy in at least one method of writing, an understanding reflected by mainstream dictionary and handbook definitions. Starting in the 1980s, however, literacy researchers h ...

                                               

Logical reasoning

Two kinds of logical reasoning can be distinguished in addition to formal deduction: induction and abduction. Given a precondition or premise, a conclusion or logical consequence and a rule or material conditional that implies the conclusion give ...

                                               

Logos

Logos is a term in Western philosophy, psychology, rhetoric, and religion derived from a Greek word variously meaning "ground", "plea", "opinion", "expectation", "word", "speech", "account", "reason", "proportion", and "discourse". It became a te ...

                                               

Meta-Functional Expertise

Meta-functional expertise is the breadth of one’s strategically important knowledge. This is different from the traditional conceptualization of expertise, which is generally considered to be a great depth of knowledge in a defined area. Thus, ex ...

                                               

Metaknowledge

Metaknowledge or meta-knowledge is knowledge about a preselected knowledge. For the reason of different definitions of knowledge in the subject matter literature, meta-information may or may not be included in meta-knowledge. Detailed cognitive, ...

                                               

Knowledge mobilization

The term knowledge mobilization refers to moving available knowledge into active use. More than just "bridging the gap", KMb seeks to make connections between research/expertise and policy/practice in order to improve outcomes in various organiza ...

                                               

Multidisciplinarity

                                               

Mutual knowledge (logic)

Mutual knowledge is a fundamental concept about information in game theory, logic, and epistemology. An event is mutual knowledge if all agents know that the event occurred. However, mutual knowledge by itself implies nothing about what agents kn ...

                                               

Knowledge neglect

Knowledge neglect refers to cases when people fail to retrieve and apply previously stored knowledge appropriately into a current situation. Perhaps the most famous example of knowledge neglect is the Moses Illusion, discovered in 1981 by Erickso ...

                                               

Network of practice

Network of practice is a concept originated by John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid. This concept, related to the work on communities of practice by Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger, refers to the overall set of various types of informal, emergent social ...

                                               

Non-science

A non-science is an area of study that is not scientific, especially one that is not a natural science or a social science that is an object of scientific inquiry. In this model, history, art, and religion are all examples of non-sciences.

                                               

Noogony

Noogony is a general term for any theory of knowledge that attempts to explain the origin of concepts in the human mind by considering sense or a posteriori data as solely relevant.

                                               

Noology

Noology derives from the ancient Greek words νοῦς, nous or "mind" and λόγος, logos. Noology thus outlines a systematic study and organization of thought, knowledge and the mind.

                                               

Nous

Nous, sometimes equated to intellect or intelligence, is a term from classical philosophy for the faculty of the human mind necessary for understanding what is true or real. English words such as "understanding" are sometimes used, but three comm ...

                                               

Numeracy

Numeracy is the ability to reason and to apply simple numerical concepts. Basic numeracy skills consist of comprehending fundamental arithmetics like addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. For example, if one can understand simple m ...

                                               

Obscurantism

Obscurantism is the practice of deliberately presenting information in an imprecise and recondite manner, often designed to forestall further inquiry and understanding. There are two historical and intellectual denotations of Obscurantism: the de ...

                                               

Omniscience

Omniscience is the capacity to know everything. In monotheistic religions, such as Sikhism and the Abrahamic religions, this is an attribute of God. In Jainism, omniscience is an attribute that any individual can eventually attain. In Buddhism, t ...

                                               

Open knowledge

Open knowledge also known as free knowledge is knowledge that one is free to use, reuse, and redistribute without legal, social or technological restriction. Open knowledge is a set of principles and methodologies related to the production and di ...

                                               

Knowledge organization

Knowledge organization, organization of knowledge, organization of information, or information organization is an intellectual discipline concerned with activities such as document description, indexing, and classification that serve to provide s ...

                                               

Organizing Knowledge Cognitively

A concept is a system of grouping and categorizing our brain uses to sort and store information. Concepts change and adapt as the amount of knowledge about a particular subject changes and grows. For example, as a child we were told that dogs and ...

                                               

Pantomath

A pantomath is a person who wants to know and knows everything. The word itself is not to be found in common online English dictionaries, the OED, dictionaries of obscure words, or dictionaries of neologisms. Logic dictates that there are no lite ...

                                               

Perspicacity

Perspicacity is a penetrating discernment - a clarity of vision or intellect which provides a deep understanding and insight. It takes the concept of wisdom deeper in the sense that it denotes a keenness of sense and intelligence applied to insig ...

                                               

Privileged access

In the fields of epistemology and philosophy of mind, a person has privileged access to their own thoughts. This implies the subject has access to, and knows, their own thoughts in such a way that others do not. Privileged access can be character ...

                                               

Rationality

Rationality is the quality or state of being rational – that is, being based on or agreeable to reason. Rationality implies the conformity of ones beliefs with ones reasons to believe, and of ones actions with ones reasons for action. "Rationalit ...

                                               

Knowledge regime

A knowledge regime is a type of system involving a specific set of actors, organizations, and institutions that create policy ideas used to alter the organization and overall operation of the policy-making and production process. Knowledge regime ...

                                               

Remember versus know judgements

There is evidence suggesting that different processes are involved in remembering something versus knowing whether it is familiar. It appears that "remembering" and "knowing" represent relatively different characteristics of memory as well as ref ...

                                               

Research

Research is "creative and systematic work undertaken to increase the stock of knowledge, including knowledge of humans, culture and society, and the use of this stock of knowledge to devise new applications.". It involves the collection, organiza ...

                                               

Scholar

A scholar is a person who devotes time to scholarly pursuits, particularly to the development of expertise in one area of study. A scholar may also be an academic, a person who works as a teacher or researcher at a university or other higher educ ...

                                               

Scientia potentia est

The phrase scientia potentia est is a Latin aphorism meaning "knowledge is power". It is commonly attributed to Sir Francis Bacon, although there is no known occurrence of this precise phrase in Bacons English or Latin writings. However, the expr ...

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Pino - logical board game which is based on tactics and strategy. In general this is a remix of chess, checkers and corners. The game develops imagination, concentration, teaches how to solve tasks, plan their own actions and of course to think logically. It does not matter how much pieces you have, the main thing is how they are placement!

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